nebroadwe: Write write write edit edit edit edit edit & post. (Writer)
Title: True Callings
Fandom: Dark Oracle
Character(s): Everyone, eventually
Pairing(s): Canon 'ships (including unresolved Cally/Omen and equally unresolved Cally/Emmett)
Rating: PG
Word Count: 2091 (this chapter)
Warnings: Set post-series.
A/N: Welcome to the interim results of my massive effort of discipline: a novel-length first episode of the third season of Dark Oracle that never was. I have it completely plotted out in ten chapters, a prologue, an epilogue and a coda, and I will always be one completed draft chapter ahead of anything I post. Nevertheless, I can't promise that my energy won't flag before I manage to finish this monster. You have been warned. Concrit welcomed with a set of lockpicks.



      When the key turned in the lock of his cell door, the young man seated on the floor against the opposite wall merely tilted his head back to observe what followed. He was tired, for one thing, his body still aching from the beating, magical and physical, he'd taken upon capture. For another, he was damned if he'd give his jailers any sign they could construe as respect or fear. His ribs might be bruised, but his pride was intact.

      Read more... )
nebroadwe: Write write write edit edit edit edit edit & post. (Writer)
Friday's Word Count:
0 (c. 1, draft)
Saturday's Word Count:
520 (c. 1, draft)
Sunday's Word Count:
1600 (c. 1, draft, completed)
Sample Text:
Read more... )
Week six word counts are all zilch, again -- nothing but backbone for chapter 2, pieced out as I walk to the trolley stop in the morning. At least chapter 1 has a complete draft at last! This has been one of the busiest weeks of my life, but (thank goodness!) it's almost over. I fully intend to get back on a regular schedule in the coming week [/militantly creative].
nebroadwe: Write write write edit edit edit edit edit & post. (Writer)
Friday's Word Count:
0 (c. 1, draft)
Saturday's Word Count:
0 (c. 1, draft)
Sunday's Word Count:
175 (c. 1, draft)
Sample Text:
Read more... )
Week five word counts are all zilch, again -- nothing but backbone for scene 4, but thankfully I've got a complete outline now. I'm beginning to feel like Jane Austen, snatching moments to write in between the duties imposed by society. What the person sitting next to me on the trolley every morning thinks I'm about is beyond me, really.
nebroadwe: Write write write edit edit edit edit edit & post. (Writer)
Friday's Word Count:
0 (c. 1, draft)
Saturday's Word Count:
599 (c. 1, draft)
Sunday's Word Count:
12 (c. 1, draft); 1212 (draft of a Legend of Korra story, tentatively titled "Keeping Up Appearances")
Sample Text:
Read more... )
Week four word counts are easy: zilch. I've been backboning scene 4 all week, trying to get it to gel, and I think it's finally starting to come together. Hopefully today will see some actual verbiage produced.
nebroadwe: Write write write edit edit edit edit edit & post. (Writer)
Monday's Word Count:
124 (c. 1, draft)
Tuesday's Word Count:
174 (c. 1, draft)
Wednesday's Word Count:
140 (c. 1, draft)
Thursday's Word Count:
31 (c. 1, draft)
Sample Text:
Read more... )
This last scene of chapter 1 has decided to give me trouble. Bah, humbug. I persevere.
nebroadwe: (Books)
From the Greenwillow Blog, a comment from the late Diana Wynne Jones on reader response to one of her, uh, best-loved characters:
The one big, strange fact about Howl is that almost every young woman who reads about him wants to marry him. They began wanting to before the book was even published and they all confess their wish quite openly. Yesterday I was doing a question-and-answer session in a London theatre and a teenage girl put her hand up and said -- without any embarrassment at all -- that she had long wanted to marry Howl and would I mind. I wondered whether to ask her if she would mind everywhere being covered with green slime when Howl’s hair went wrong; or if she minded coping with a man who had head colds like a drama queen; or being twisted round Howl’s little finger; or would it worry her that the man was a terrible coward; or always falling in love with other women; or ... But I could see she regarded these facts as a challenge. So I sat with my mouth open for a second and then told her that she had now joined the end of a very long line that stretches at least once around the world.

This didn’t appear to trouble her unduly.
Paging Cleolinda Jones for a psychological consult! (Actually, I'd love to read a Cleolinda Jones review of Howl's Moving Castle for all kinds of reasons, not just this one.) But this quotation piqued my interest because (in addition to being amusing) it ties in to an issue I'm trying to work out in my massive effort of discipline: Read more... ) In short, characterization is HARD.

Phew. It's nice to have that off my chest. :-)
nebroadwe: Write write write edit edit edit edit edit & post. (Writer)
Title: Drabble: Disprized Love
Fandom: Dark Oracle
Character(s): Cally, Lance
Pairing(s): Cally/OC as background
Rating: G
Word Count: 100
Warnings: Set post-series.
A/N: This is a character drabble, developed as I worked out some post-series headcanon for the characters as part of writing True Callings, my season 3 novel. Concrit welcomed with a subscription to said developing novel (if you dare ...).



      Cally hates it when Lance pretends to forget her dates' names and says "Emmett" instead: How's, um, Emmett? and Emmett visiting again? and Emmett -- I mean Allan -- left another message; give him your cell number already!

Read more... )
nebroadwe: Write write write edit edit edit edit edit & post. (Writer)
Friday's Word Count:
202 (c. 1, draft, plus 1 page of backbone [not counted] for the dream sequence from c. 2)
Saturday's Word Count:
0 (c. 1, draft, plus two pages of backbone [not counted] for c. 1, sc. 3 and a complete dialogue backbone [not counted] for a Legend of Korra shortfic, tentatively titled "Keeping Up Appearances")
Sunday's Word Count:
1255 (c. 1, draft); 100 (draft of a Dark Oracle drabble, tentatively titled "Disprized Love")
Sample Text:
Read more... )
This weekend's work brings me to the end of scene three of four in chapter one. Backboning things out first does seem to help me keep the exposition down -- I've pushed a lot of stuff off into future chapters rather than dump it all here, which can only help.
nebroadwe: Write write write edit edit edit edit edit & post. (Writer)
Monday's Word Count:
336 (c. 1, draft)
Tuesday's Word Count:
24 (c. 1, draft)
Wednesday's Word Count:
236 (c. 1, draft)
Thursday's Word Count:
372 (c. 1, draft)
Sample Text:
Read more... )
Bit of a slog through here -- lots of blocking and extreme amounts of exposition. This scene is going to be much drafty-er than the ones that preceded it. Still, soldiering on ...
nebroadwe: Write write write edit edit edit edit edit & post. (Writer)
Friday's Word Count:
84 (c. 1, draft)
Saturday's Word Count:
441 (c. 1, draft)
Sunday's Word Count:
949 (c. 1, draft)
Sample Text:
Read more... )
This weekend's work brings me to the end of scene two of four in chapter one. Halfway home! (In a sense ...)
nebroadwe: Write write write edit edit edit edit edit & post. (Writer)
I'm writing again. And it's going to be a (fanfiction) novel.

I'm trying not to think too hard about that second sentence. I've only ever managed to complete one novel-length narrative (in plot terms -- in page count it was a long novella; in polish, a draft) and that was eons ago, in high school, when I had much lower expectations for my prose. I've had ideas for novels and made notes for them and even drafted scenes and the odd chapter, but I've almost always lacked the discipline to finish up.

But.

I have this one completely plotted in outline. I've got a preliminary chapter list (10, plus prologue and epilogue). I've written the entire prologue in real words. I've followed that up immediately with a draft of the first scene of chapter one. The characters are talking to me, giving me detailed notes for future scenes. The only thing I need to do is keep writing.

Eep. Help. I'll never make it!

It's so easy not to write, y'see. I can spend hour after pleasant hour blocking scenes in my imagination, watching the mental movie, fast-forwarding through the tedious exposition and set-up to the exciting bits. Actually planting myself on the couch with pen and paper (initial draft) or at the desk with the keyboard (from draft to real words) is WORK. I work all day. Doing more in the evening seems ... difficult. Tiresome. Bletcherous.

That said, once I get on a roll, I can crank out the pages -- at least for now. It's the honeymoon phase, when the inspiration is hot and the words are malleable. Which is why I'm adopting Pliny's motto and trying my darndest to produce at least a line a day, regardless of what else I have to do. I'm also trying to keep it in sequence, rather than jumping around. I don't know if that'll help in the long run, but I'm thinking that if I can post each chapter once the next one has made it out of draft, I might develop an audience. And having a responsibility to a reader or three might push me to complete an actual, card-carrying, novel-length 'fic.

Or not. I dunno. But I'm gonna try.
nebroadwe: From "The Magdalen Reading" by Rogier van der Weyden.  (Default)
So last week, one of the most unpleasant weeks in the history of ever, was also one during which I discovered two truly awesome things.

Thing the First:
Dark Oracle is an Emmy-winning Canadian live-action fantasy television program for young adults that ran for two 13-episode seasons back in the mid-oughts. (It's currently broadcasting on the "This TV" channel on Saturday mornings, which is where I encountered it.) Protagonists Lance and Cally Stone are fifteen-year-old twins: she's pretty, popular and a driving force behind most of her school's fundraisers; he's a quiet gaming-and-comic-books geek. One afternoon a frog (yes, you read that right, but don't worry -- this isn't an anthropomorphized animal tale) inflicts the first issue of a comic book, the eponymous Dark Oracle, on them. The pages are largely blank, but seem to detail the adventures of fifteen-year-old twins Blaze and Violet in a dark, crumbling town filled with unpleasant magic, dangerous gangs, and teen angst turned up to eleven. In the first season, the comic book seems to predict or mirror potentially problematic or disastrous events in Lance and Cally's lives, the panels gradually filling in as the plot in both worlds unfolds. By episode thirteen Blaze and Violet have twigged to the connection between their world and ours and the second season has them attempting to cross over, possibly with extreme prejudice to their counterparts. There's trippy weirdness, adventure, narrow escapes, and enough shipping to fill a port. :-)

Read more... )
Thing the Second:
So my friends and I road-tripped to Washington, D.C., for the Cherry Blossom Festival, but unfortunately missed peak bloom altogether. Thank you, global warming. On the other hand, we did catch the Kite Festival, which was a blast. There's nothing like being on the National Mall with hundreds of other people effectively reenacting the last scene from Mary Poppins. I hadn't put a kite in the air for twenty-five years, but in helping the small children in our group get theirs up, I realized both that I'm still pretty good at it and that I really, really enjoy it. It was hard not to hog the string, actually. As soon as I can manage, I'm buying a kite of my own and taking it over to the park of an evening to play. I had too much fun to let another twenty-five years go by without flying a kite.

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nebroadwe: From "The Magdalen Reading" by Rogier van der Weyden.  (Default)
The Magdalen Reading

August 2014

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